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MASSIVE X 使い方⑥ Trackers / Performers / Voice Randomization

MASSIVE X 使い方⑥ Trackers / Performers / Voice Randomization


Welcome to our last instalment in our Massive X tutorial series. In our previous video we took a look at the center Modulation, Envelope, and LFO but this time we will be taking a look at the very unique and flexible Trackers, Performer, and Voice Randomization features. Lets first take a look at Trackers. This is great for adding small edits to performance and creating nuance as well. There are multiple parameters that can be changed, and the currently selected parameter will be applied. We have Note Pitch selected, which relates the currently played pitches. For example, if we wanted to add reverb to this, In this case there will be the same amount of reverb applied to all notes. Though often mentioned in mixing ideologies, adding too much reverb on low end frequencies bloats the overall sound. You can use trackers to remedy this as well. We’ll set the reverb Mix to 0 so no reverb is being applied. We will assign a Tracker here. We will also determine the span of the Tracker. If we play a note now, the played note will show up in the guide area. This slanted line is the amount, so in this case the lower the pitch, the less reverb, and on the other hand, when the pitch is higher, there is more reverb. By doing this, you can still apply reverb while avoiding the muddiness of low frequencies. If we give this a listen, The highest pitch here was D4. If we wanted more reverb here, we can click to add a point here and by simply dragging we can adjust the amount. Because multiple points can be made, you could decrease reverb above a certain point and make other complex settings like so. With only 1 point set, it will change how the reverb is applied to low frequencies as well so we can make another point to counteract it. Now we have no reverb on low notes, From around C3 and above, we have plenty of reverb applied. Lets try another example. Lets switch to a new Tracker and select Velocity. This works similar to Note Pitch, and the velocity amount being played is shown on the area shown. For example, if the note F is played weak and played stronger. Just the velocity of the note is shown on this area like so. For example, we can assign this to pitch and with some basic setting, when the same note is played stronger, and when it’s played weaker. The pitch is changed via the note velocity, and thought this setting is a bit extreme, by adding a small amount of change, we can have a slightly sharper pitch when notes are played stronger, or a slightly lower pitch when notes are played weaker. You can create nuances similar to a live instrument, and using this as a secret spice to your sounds may make for interesting effects. Next lets take a look at Performers. Performers allow you to freely draw modulation curves in correlation with the track’s tempo. With 1 to 8, you can draw in up to 8 bars, but if you don’t need so many, you can drag on this area here to change the span. Here we have 2 bars, and we can drag the front and move the span to anywhere in the 8 bars as well. Like other modulation parameters, simply drag it onto whatever parameter you want to assign it to. This time we have a longer part like so, we will add volume changes to this to create a backing part. Because OSC 1 and 2 are both being used, we will assign this to the Master level. Though we just have to drag to determine the span of the effect, because we’re going for a rhythmic backing part, we want parts with and without sound. We will set the level to 0 first, and drag upwards to determine the span of change. This orange area will be the highest amount the Performer can reach. Here lets take a look at what Bipolar and Unipolar are. It’s currently set to 0, placed in the center in the Performer area. Because the volume is 0 it can’t go any lower, meaning we won’t have to use any negative settings here. Using the Unipolar setting will be best for this situation. The current parameter point is at the very bottom, making it easier to edit. On the other hand, if you want the starting point to be in the center and go into negative amounts, set to Bipolar. The center is the current parameter setting, At the lowest point it reaches the maximum grey setting, and at the highest it reaches the maximum orange. We will lower the level again and select Unipolar. All that’s left is to edit but it will be easier to see if we zoom in. In this situation, by dragging this area on the bottom you can zoom in/out. The steps are currently set to 8th notes. By clicking in this area, you can switch to 16th notes, 32nd notes, and so on. We can make edits here to change the curve of the parameter. We will set the volume span from 0 to the max and write in some more here. By doing so, The volume curve moves just as the automation shows here. We can click to add in another point, and drag to change the amount. By pulling on a line, you can make detailed edits to the curve as well. We can make some very detailed nuances using these features. There are edit tools with various shapes available as well. In general, though most curves are exactly as they look, by holding down a click and dragging, you can make multiple curves at once. Very cool phrases like this can easily be made as well. We can use these techniques to make our pattern. In addition, you can create up to 12 patterns per Performer. Click on the numbers below to make changes to each pattern. 1-12 are compatible with MIDI key switches. C-1 is the 1st pattern, and 2 onward is triggered as you go up by half-steps. By sequencing the MIDI note in the MIDI performance, you can automatically trigger a different pattern. Lets try applying the Performer pattern to the high-pass filter’s frequency. We will select 2 as shown. We will write in a pattern, and play. We highly recommend this technique of using filters to create rhythm tracks as well. Last lets take a look at the final VR or Voice Randomization modulator. As the name implies, this applies randomisation to a parameter. For example, we have this repeating phrase in our track. Becasue this part was simply sequenced and lacks interest, we will use this VR to add some random variation to it. We will assign this VR to the parameter we want to effect. Like every other modulation, we must change the amount for change to take place. For example, we can set this to 20 half-steps and play C3. Each time its played a different pitch will randomly play within the 20 half-step range. Like so. Of course, simply applying this much change won’t match the key so we’ll just set a small amount. We will set the sustain to 0 for the time being to change the note lengths as well. Once we’ve determined the best center point for note length, we can assign randomisation to it. Once again we will drag up/down to set the span of randomisation as well. If we set this too wide, we will have quite a bit of variation. We will adjust to find a more natural sounding point. We’ll apply this to filter and volume as well. By doing so, Even if the phrase is repeated, we can get a slightly different take every time, helping prevent the repeating phrase from sounding boring or the same. Lets hear how it sounds in the track. We believe you can emulate analog synth pitch inconsistencies as well, so try it out in your own phrases and sounds. This completes our multi-video tutorial on MASSIVE X. Massive X has evolved to be full of useful features and easier to use and we recommend trying out this amazing synth in your own music! If you enjoyed this video, be sure to like and subscribe! Thanks for watching, and see you next time! Follow us on Twitter! Follow the link in our description

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

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